Category: Tin Tức

History

RUSH HOUR

Formed in 1966 when the future of the Isle of Man Railway hung in the balance, the Manx Railway Society (as it was then known) was made up from a group of like-minded individuals whose aim it was to ensure that the railway was retained in one form or another; the previous year had been financially unsuccessful for the Railway Company and at the time it looked like it would be the last year the railway would […]

Summary History

Summary History

The magazine started life in 1966 as a simple type-written foolscap newsletter which was by  photostat to a handful of members; as the group expanded this proved to be an ideal way of keeping everyone informed of the goings-on which were plentiful at this turbulent time in the railway’s history.  The format was changed to a magazine style layout and by 1969 Steam Railway News proper was born. Earlier issues were printed with coloured covers but the content […]

RUSH HOUR

RUSH HOUR

Saturday 7th – Monday 9th April 2012 Returning again in 2012 this popular three-day event takes place over the Easter Weekend and includes intense operations and unusual combinations.  Included below are details of the 2011 event – these will be replaced by a full itinerary for the 2012 event as soon as they become available. The 2011 event saw an evening photography session recreating two trains departing Douglas Station with one bound for Peel, making […]

The Ramsey Line

The Ramsey Line

By far the most spectacular of the island’s lines, the ambitious northern section caused headaches throughout its lifetime, most notably the exposed section at Gob-Y-Deigan and the embankments nearby.  The majority of major stations on the northern line were constructed of local sandstone which has a distinctive pink-red colour; notable exceptions were the terminus building in Ramsey which was Italian in style and the unusual design of Sulby Glen, itself a replacement station.  The longest […]

The South Line

The South Line

The South Line The second-built of the Railway Company’s lines is characterised by more varied landscape and gradients, with different building styles at the stations, and a “standard” wooden structure being installed at Santon, Ballasalla and Colby (the former still being extant today).  The terminus building at Port Erin station forms the focal point of the village, and a similarly impressive structure exsits at nearby Port St. Mary, although this is currently empty for the most part.  the running […]

The Peel Line

The Peel Line

This section details the stations and halts on the first line opened by the Railway Company from Douglas to Peel in 1873.  The structures which dotted the route of this line were varied and there was no one dedicated style as would later be seen on the other lines.  The line, although scenic, was largely flat and gave the locomotives less work to do than the Port Erin line that was to follow a year later.  The station […]